Photo Gallery

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The Fromagerie de Montbovon.
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At work at the Fromagerie de Montbovon.
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Montbovon cheese shop.
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I love old posters.

 

 

 

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The Master of Ceremonies sits at the start line.
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Gloucester cheese rolling became an even better day when I ran into my good friends, Richard and Stephanie, at the event!
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Two french runners, displaying their French pride.
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The rugby team is ready to tackle out-of-control runners.
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Many runners, like this Canadian I met, chose to dress up for the cheese rolling.
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Children race for a smaller wheel of Double Gloucester cheese.
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At the start line for the women’s race.
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Made it to the finish line.
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Half-way down Cooper’s Hill.
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Climbing back up.
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The start line for the up-hill race. I was the only woman who signed up for it.

 

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Cheese rolling photo with another runner. He won the second men’s race.
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Rod Smart, cheesemaker who supplied the Double Gloucester cheese for the event.

 

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Mongolian specialty yak cheese from Tsetsgee in Ulaanbataar.
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Although I could not read this picture book, I found the illustrations (of Mongolian children hand milking cows) to be quite charming.
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Unlike American milk labels, that tend to feature pastoral images of red barns and silos, Mongolian milk labels have yurt images.
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Along roadsides, it is common to see Buddhist “offerings.” At this particular one, I found dried and (by the looks of it) very old cheese.
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Camel milk tends to be sour but this guy was pretty sweet.

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More horses and riders.
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My new friend, Badrakh, and his mother invited me to have lunch with them. We are eating traditional Mongolian food (beef, cabbage, carrots, and noodles) and drinking milk tea.
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Dress-up is fun. Here I am in traditional Mongolian clothing with my friend, Badrakh.
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On our way to visit the Chinggis Khan statue, Badrakh and I stopped to see some owls (like this one) as well as some eagles.
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Horses are to Mongolia as cheese is to me.
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In Mongolia, there is a massive Chinggis Khan statue that I visited with Badrakh.

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Mongolian herdsmen (Chimgee and Haygaa’s neighbor) alongside his flock.
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I like these small fruit stands that are very common throughout the city.
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My new front door.
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I live on the 11th floor of the red and yellow building in the background.
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This is the tiny market near my apartment where I found the bulk raw milk for sale in the beer cooler.
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Milk cartons for kids come in both a variety of flavors (chocolate, strawberry, banana) and are centrally placed in this supermarket’s aisles.
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How about a little souffle cheese cake?
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Bulk raw-milk and bulk yogurt.
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There is an abundance of Mongolian butter as well.
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Mongolia’s two dietary staples side by side: beef and cheese.
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If cow, yak, or horse cheese is daunting… bigger markets offer Gouda, Edamer, and Mozzarella alternatives.
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Aarts is a fresh horse or camel milk cheese that Mongolians will mix with water and drink.
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Aarul cheese again. This time in bulk bags.
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Fermented camel milk, anyone?
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Bulk raw-milk for sale in the supermarket.
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Mongolian milk.
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Cheesecake Ice Cream in Ulaanbaatar.
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Warming up fresh milk in the yurt.
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Did not have a clue that I was too tall to wear traditional Mongolian dresses but I love this picture with Chimgee anyways.
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Mongolian cow waiting to be milked.
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All baby animals like a little love.
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Haygaa bottle feeds the newborn foal.
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Oyo bringing the horses and cattle to get water.
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Haygaa, Chimgee, and Oyo took me to visit a Buddhist retreat one afternoon.
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Chimgee taught me how to make Mongolian dumplings or “bansh.”
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Haygaa rides bareback.
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Chimgee taking the cows out to pasture.
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Mongolian cows head out to pasture.
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Chimgee during evening milking.
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Chimgee doing the morning milking.
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Bringing milk back to the yurt.
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The valley.
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Chimgee taking the cows out to pasture.
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Hyagaa pauses during our card game to observe Chimgee making Mongolian yogurt.
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At work at the Araxá competition.
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Reinaldo de Lima, President of the Araxá Cheeemaker’s Association and 3rd place winner of the Araxá competition, presents me with a judging certificate and souvenirs from Araxá,
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Araxá cheese competition judging.
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At work at the Araxá competition.
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Journaling sesh with a great view of Sao Paulo.
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Canastra cheese at the A Queijaria
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Owners Fernando and Luciana Oliviera of the A Queijaria, a speciality Brazilian cheese shop, in Sao Paulo.
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Coffee with a side of cheese in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

 

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Tour of maturation room with Alexandre Honorato and Bruno Cabral.
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Small Araxa cheese in maturation room of Alexandre Honorato
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Calf hutches in Araxa
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Bruno Cabral, owner of Mestre Queijeiro, and Reinaldo Antonio , President of the Araxa cheesemakers association at our tour of Sitio Real dairy.
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International raw-milk cheese day dégustation at the Mestre Queijeiro cheese shop

 

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Canastra cheese production
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Canastra cheese visit and lunch break
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Traditional Caracu cows in Canastra
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Canastra Lobozo, a sweet made with cheese
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Solange and Carlos Henrique, Canastra cheesemakers in their new maturation room
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Last day in Canastra with Guilherme
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Fresh Canastra cheese at lunch time
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Pao de Queijo (typical Brazilian cheese bread) for breakfast in Canastra
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Ednar, Neila, and Geovana– a farmer-cheesemaker family who I loved spending time with.
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Typical Canastra farm.
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Typical cheese-making “facility” in Canastra.

8 thoughts on “Photo Gallery

  1. What a life you are having! I could look at your photos for hours! I just heard you on NPR’s Splendid Table and you immediately caught my attention. I am a lover of cheese too so I am pleased to learn about Mongolian cheese, even though it sounds like it may be a bit challenging to eat. I look forward Linnea to hearing more about your journeys in the future. Blessings, CORI

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    1. Hi Cori ! Thank you for reaching out, it is great to hear from you and to meet another cheese lover. I am so lucky to have had the opportunity to travel the world studying artisan cheese and to now build a career doing the same thing. I will keep writing about it! I’d love to swap cheese stories with you as well at some point.

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